Noticeboard

Flu 2020 Newsletter: Flu 2020 Newsletter

Important information about the coronavirus (COVID-19)

The NHS in Telford & Wrekin and Public Health England (PHE) are well prepared for outbreaks of new infectious diseases. The NHS has put in place measures to ensure the safety of all patients and NHS staff while also ensuring services are available to the public as normal.

The latest information on symptoms of Coronovirus infection and areas where recent travel may have resulted in a high risk of exposure can be found on nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/

NHS 111 has an online coronavirus service that can tell you if you need medical help and advise you what to do.

Use this service if:

you think you might have coronavirus;

in the last 14 days you've been to a country or area with a high risk of coronavirus;

you've been in close contact with someone with coronavirus.

Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital. Call 111 if you need to speak to someone.

Like the common cold, coronavirus infection usually occurs through close contact with a person with novel coronavirus via cough and sneezes or hand contact. A person can also catch the virus by touching contaminated surfaces if they do not wash their hands.

Testing of suspected coronavirus cases is carried out in line with strict guidelines. This means that suspected cases are kept in isolation, away from public areas of GP surgeries, pharmacies and hospitals and returned home also in isolation. Any equipment that come into contact with suspected cases are thoroughly cleaned as appropriate. Specific guidance has also been shared with NHS staff to help safeguard them and others. Patients can be reassured that their safety is a top priority, and are encouraged to attend all appointments as usual.

Everyone is being reminded to follow Public Health England advice to:

Always carry tissues with you and use them to catch your cough or sneeze. Then bin the tissue, and wash your hands, or use a sanitiser gel.

Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after using public transport. Use a sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available.

Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid close contact with people who are unwell.

 

 https://www.telfordccg.nhs.uk/your-health/medicines-management/coronavirus-covid-19

NEW: Text Messaging Service

Donnington Medical Practice has introduced a new text messaging service to enable Doctors, Nurses and Administrators to send text messages direct to patients. If you prefer NOT to receive texts from the practice, please let one of our receptionists know. 

Telford Health Hearts:   https://www.telfordccg.nhs.uk/your-health/telford-healthy-hearts

NHS Apps Library:   https://www.nhs.uk/apps-library

Sickness Certificates

You do not require a doctor's sickness certificate for any illness lasting seven days or less. Your employer may however require you to complete a self-certification form (SC2) which is available from your employer or on the HMRC website.

Evidence that you are sick

If you are sick for more than seven days, your employer can ask you to give them some form of medical evidence to support payment of SSP (statutory sick pay).

Your employer can ask you to confirm that you've been ill.You can do this by filling in a form yourself when you return to work. This is called self-certification.

If you're sick and off work for more than seven days, your employer will probably ask for proof of your illness. Most employers ask for a fit note from your GP.

However, this will also depend on your employer's company policy on sick leave (or sickness absence). This policy should tell you how many days you can be off sick before you need to provide proof of illness or a fit note.

You could also provide evidence from someone who is not a medical practitioner, e.g. a dentist. Your employer will decide whether or not this evidence is acceptable. If your employer has any doubts, they may still ask for a medical certificate from your GP.

Get an isolation note - NHS website

Get an isolation note

Use this service if you have to stay at home because of coronavirus and you need a note for your employer.

If you have to stay at home but feel well enough to work, ask your employer if you can work from home. If you can work from home, you will not need an isolation note.

You can also use this service for someone else.

To access this service click on this link:  https://111.nhs.uk/isolation-note/

Statement of Fitness for Work - ’Fit Note'

The 'fit note' was introduced on 6 April 2010. With your employer's support, the note will help you return to work sooner by providing more information about the effects of your illness or injury.

For more information see the DirectGov website (where this information was sourced)

Going Back to Work

You DO NOT need a note from the doctor to enable you to return to work. Guidance from Department for Work and Pensions specifically states the following:

IMPORTANT: Your employee can go back to work at any time (including before the end of the fit note) without going back to see their doctor - even if their doctor has indicated that they need to assess them again. This will not breach your Employers Liability Compulsory Insurance, providing a suitable risk assessment has taken place if required.

Further information can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/464398/fit-note-employers-line_managers-sept-2015.pdf

OR

http://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/2559.aspx?CategoryID=190&SubCategoryID=1903

 

Fit Notes for School Children 

WE DO NOT ISSUE FIT NOTES FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN…….

 

GPs are not contractually obliged to provide a sick note for children who are off sick from school (ref GPC website Jan 2010). In normal circumstances when a child has been absent from school, the parent should give the child a note to take into school when he/she returns explaining the reason for absence.

 

Most minor illnesses are self-limiting and do not require contact with a general practitioner or a medical certificate. The GP’s role is to provide advice and treatment for childhood illnesses, when needed, to facilitate an early return to school. In cases of prolonged illness (five days or earlier if there are parental concerns), parents should telephone their GP for medical advice and will be offered telephone advice and/or an appointment if clinically necessary. Medical certification for short term illness is not appropriate and should not be requested as standard school policy. On the rare occasion medical evidence is deemed necessary by the school, due to recurrent absences related to illness, a request may be made in writing by a senior member of staff, with the parent’s informed and written consent, and a fee will be payable. GPs can only give a private medical certificate when they have documentary evidence to confirm actual illness; i.e. from the date that the child has sought medical advice. This is a ‘private’ certificate and the GP is entitled to charge a fee for this service. Retrospective certificates are not valid and should not be issued.

 



 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website